UNION

Popup

Extend parental bereavement leave for miscarriages, GMB tells Govt

08 Jun 2021
Press Office

Press Office

Member requiring help?
Printable PDF

Miscarriage touches the lives of millions - all people who should have proper protection and support

GMB, Britain’s general union, has called on Ministers to extend parental bereavement leave for parents suffering miscarriages before the 24th week of pregnancy.

A motion, passed at the union’s annual policy-making conference, also called for pregnant workers to be able to take the 11th to the 13th week of a pregnancy off without affecting their annual leave - due to the increased risk of miscarriage during the transition between the first and second trimester.

While GMB welcomes ‘Jack’s law’, we call loudly for the Government to amend this legislation to be more inclusive, compassionate and supportive - with rights for both partners in families that experience miscarriages.

Nell Andrew, GMB National Equality and Inclusion Officer

GMB delegates welcomed new Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Regulations known as ‘Jack’s Law’ which came into force on 6 April 2020 and gives a statutory right to a minimum of two weeks’ leave for all employed parents if they lose a child under the age of 18, or have a stillbirth from the 24th week of pregnancy.

But the new law does not go far enough, the conference heard.

GMB’s 103rd annual congress, where the lay member, ruling body of GMB decides GMB policy is taking place online this year due to the ongoing pandemic.

Nell Andrew, GMB National Equality and Inclusion Officer, said:

"At least 1 in 8 known pregnancies end in miscarriage and many more happen before pregnancy is known.

“Miscarriage touches the lives of millions - all people who should have proper protection and the vital support they need.

“While GMB welcomes ‘Jack’s law’, we call loudly for the Government to amend this legislation to be more inclusive, compassionate and supportive - with rights for both partners in families that experience miscarriages.

“This has to include paid time off for parents to grieve and to heal, as well as other supportive measures.

“For parents who lose child under 18 or experience still birth, we need a far more simplified process of providing notice regarding parental bereavement leave, to recognise the trauma and great loss these families face.”

More from GMB

 
Join more than 600,000 people and become a GMB member today
Join Us!